The Delter Coffee Press vs. Aeropress

A Comparative Review

I’m a betting man, and I bet if you’re here reading this article then you know what an Aeropress coffee maker is. Basically the holy trinity of coffee makers, and my top choice traveling coffee maker. I use it a lot at home too.

When I saw the Delter Coffee press I immediately thought of it as a knock-off Aeropress. However, the Delter Press is different because it had a successful Kickstarter campaign with 548 backers. It also claims to use a different brewing process in order to get a more consistent cup of coffee.

So this begs the question:

Is the Delter Press better than the Aeropress?

It’s not technically correct to compare the 2 heads up. I know, I know, I’ll give you a straight answer. You must understand that the Aeropress uses a technique somewhere in between an espresso machine and drip-coffee maker.

Essentially using air pressure to extract flavor from ground coffee beans like an espresso machine, but also letting the coffee bloom in the chamber somewhat like it does in a drip coffee maker.

Whereas the Delter Press uses an infusion method which they like to call “immersion” brewing. It has what they call, “Jet-Seal”, that separates the water and the coffee.

To me it sounds a lot like what Aeropress has with their air-tight seal.

Java Groove's Choice

Which is better: The Aeropress or Delter Press?

Aeropress is better than a Delter Coffee Press

Read the full review below to understand why.

Companies backstory

aeropress coffee maker Priced at a little less than 30 bucks a pop, the veteran Aeropress (or sometimes called AreoPress) was invented Alan Adler (wiki). If you haven’t heard of him, he’s a Stanford professor, and CEO of Aerobie Inc.

Fun fact: He created a flying disk that held Guinness World Records for “Longest throw of an object without any velocity-aiding feature”. This guy knows physics.

The Aeropress is simple, cost-effective, and there are always spare parts available if a part breaks. Seriously though, how do you break an Aeropress? More likely you’ll need more filters. Fortunately, they are cheap, readily available, and come in packs of 350.

The Aeropress is simple, cost-effective, and there are always spare parts available if a part breaks.

delter coffee press vs aeropressThen there is the Australian Delter Coffee Press, and as the name suggests, marketed by Delter Coffee, is your new-kid-on-the-block.

It immediately looks better than the Aeropress since the parts are more clear and shiny than the Aeropress. I’d imagine the Delter Press probably starts to change the same color as an Aeropress after a short period of time though.

In November 2018, Delter Coffee started a Kickstarter campaign. They claimed their product was more consistent coffee brewer than anything on the market. Delter Press was successful and they surpassed their goal to reach over $24,000 USD and bring their product to the masses.

Aeropress Tips & Learning Curve

The Aeropress has a pretty straightforward brewing procedure.

I must admit though, at first I made messes and was confused about all the parts. Here are things I’ve learned about the Aeropress over time.

Common AeroPress Questions

What do you do with the 2 extra parts?

Honestly, I lost them both.

One piece is used for pouring in the coffee and not spilling. The other is the base.

Should you stir the bloom?

Yes. I give a quick stir and it speeds up the process to get the strength of coffee I desire.

How long should I let the coffee bloom in the AeroPress?

20-45 seconds. 

Why doesn't the cap twist shut sometimes?

There are coffee grounds preventing you from twisting the AeroPress shut. You can try blowing them off. 

Do I really need to change the filter every time?

No. I use it till it looks a little off center, not covering the holes completely.

You can eyeball it and tell when the filter is falling apart and know it’s time to change it. 

Which method is better? Regular or Inverted?

I like inverted. However, it’s a preference. The winners at the World AeroPress Championship  (yes, it’s a thing) used it both over the years. 

I use the inverted method, which is somewhat more enjoyable and faster than the upright method to me. I feel like the coffee is in contact more with the water and I don’t bloom as long, nor do I push too slowly.

That being said, I get a smooth & clear cup of joe just about every time. Even with terrible coffee beans I buy when I try something new.

How Does the Delter Press Work?

If you don’t know how to use an Aeropress, you can check out the best travel coffee maker post. Click here and it will take you to the 60 second animation on how it works.

As for the case with Delter Press, because of its similarity in physical appearance to the Aeropress, one might think it should also operate the same way. Umm, not quite.

This kind of brewer relies on percolation/immersion brewing.

You can watch their promo video to see how it works. Like most promo videos they make it look easy and cool. I briefly explain in detail of what is going on underneath the video.

Click here if you want to jump to the next section

 

So after washing the filter with water (and having the rinse water disposed of, of course!), you place it on the cap, and then you’d readily place the ground beans in. The coarseness should be somewhere between espresso and French press.

First put about 12 grams of coffee in the brewing chamber and then have the cap screwed on. The reason for this is that unless done like so, the cap will not be firmly locked in place on the chamber. Having done all this, now you’re ready to flip the Delter Coffee maker upside down and on top of your cup.

Sounds very familiar so far, but this where the process gets even more unorthodox. In lieu of adding water and pushing the plunger downward, you should have the plunger at the fully depressed position at the beginning. Then you add water to the 200ml line. Once there, you pull the plunger to the 50ml line.

When you reach the 50 ml line, you can start the coffee extraction (the so-called “first infusion”) by pressing down gently. At this point in time, it all sounds familiar as you can start pushing the plunger down and have coffee coming out the other end. The gentler push, the better the coffee you get. Delter Press claims it’s better because the water stays in contact with the coffee longer and there is less agitation. Thus getting an overall clearer, less bitter, and more consistant cup of coffee.

You repeat this process several times at indicated water level lines, which are labeled on the contraption. After you pressed all the way down on the 50ml, you pull back up to the 100ml line. This is when you add the dosing tool to the top. They claim it’s to keep the temperature stable. I say it’s there so you don’t burn the hell out of your hand.

You repeat this step yet again, raising it up to the 100ml line, and pushing through the 50ml of air to get out all the coffee. They claim it helps reduce the amount of cleanup necessary by getting all the coffee out, therefore not spilling little drops of coffee around.

They make it look easier than it sounds in the video.

Which is easier to clean – Aeropress or Delter Press?

I always make a small mess with the Aeropress. It’s a small mess that I’ve learned to mitigate by keeping a tray under all the coffee apparatuses and paper towels nearby. Don’t get me wrong, it’s super easy to clean and avoid making a mess.

easy to clean aeropressHave I made a mess this big, no. Close, yes. Make sure it’s screwed on all the way kids.

It drips when I go to the trashcan to pop out the used dry coffee beans. Probably because I didn’t clean it right after making a cup.

Is that Aeropress’s fault? No. In my defense, I’m a clean person, but I always seem to be in a hurry. It’s not a big deal, and it’s much easier than descaling a coffee machine. If I was more considerate, I could reduce the mess.

Then we have the Delter Coffee Press cleaning process, which is a little trickier. In order to clean the brewing chamber, you should start forcing air by the plunger through the now emptied brewing chamber.

Remember the 100ml (3.3oz) at the end when there is only 50ml of water left? That’s to pump out the remaining coffee and avoid drippage later.

delter press capWhat about the cap? It is pretty much the same as the Aeropress, but since there will be some coffee left stuck in the chamber (coffee that’s too hot to touch), instead you have to tap, actually hit it, against the side of a garbage can to knock it out. Then rinse out the rest in the sink.

Do Aeropress & Delter Coffee Press use the same filters?

filters delter coffee pressNo. The two brewers use different types of filters, with the Delter Press requiring a smaller filter than the Aeropress. For some reason, I can’t understand why, but the texture of the filter is a little different on both sides. One is softer than the other side. The directions explain which side goes up in case you forget.

There are also a few interesting mechanical differences between the two. Namely;

  • The sealing of the plunger for the Delter Press is a little thinner than that of the Aeropress, not saying it feels “cheaper”, but I would be more cautious handling it due to wear and tear.
  • The “showerhead” on the Delter Press, see cap above, doesn't distribute water uniformly. The water comes from the center of the cap. This is to prevent pouring over as the Aeropress does sometimes if you don't have the filter centered.

Pro’s and Cons of the Delter Press

Pros

  • Compact
  • Looks good aesthetically
  • Can add coffee to the brewing process to get double the amount in one go.
  • Less likely to spill over the sides than Aeropress when pressing down.

Cons

  • More steps to make a cup
  • More difficult cleaning process
  • Feels delicate
  • Less 3rd party accessories made for it

Conclusion

They are similar in many ways, however they are different. The simplicity of the Aeropress is really a major factor.

Delter Press claims that you’ll get a more consistent cup of coffee. That being said, if you use the same coffee scoop, focus on water level in the chamber, use a variable temperature gooseneck kettle, and a timer; you could get consistent cup of joe. It sounds like a lot, but I do all that, sans the timer, without thinking in the morning, and get a consistent cup of coffee with the Aeropress.

So, having to buy yet another coffee apparatus to accomplish what is essentially already being done is not necessary for me.

As I mentioned, the Aeropress is still my 1st choice coffee maker. Whether it’s for traveling, drinking at home, even a gift, or if you’re in the market for a new coffee machine, whatever; it’s the best choice for making great coffee.

It just so happens that it is the most affordable coffee maker as well. Maybe not as sexy as other coffee machines out there, and it requires a little work, and it only makes 1 cup at at time, but the result is worth it.

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